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September 21, 2010
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Mando'a Lesson 14




This lesson is going to focus on adjectives and adverbs, because I've only been tossing in descriptive words occasionally throughout these lessons.  (And it was harder to create that I realized it would be.  Forget learning new languages, I may have to go back to school to relearn my English!)


Like the lesson on verbs, the lesson will be in regular text, round brackets will surround notes from me, and square brackets will be around direct "lesson quotes" from Karen Traviss' Grammar Guide.  (Which can be found on her webpage, and I highly recommend downloading it for personal use.)


(Working from a list of common English adjectives and adverbs, I have compiled these lists – I will have obviously missed words in the dictionary, please just bear with me.)

[Adjectives and adverbs are formed by the addition of the suffix -la or -yc, depending on which makes pronunciation easier. There is only one form of the adjective. – KT]

Creating adjectives from other words is up to the user here, since we can add –la or –yc, whatever we like the sound of.  A lot of the time I used –yc because that was the one I saw the most in the dictionary.  (I.e. Blood – Tal, Bloody – Talyc.  Mud – Slaat, Muddy – Slaat'yc)  I found that there was not a lot of direction for adjectives that are created with endings like –less, or –ful.  I wasn't sure if there would be a certain ending to make the change to the word known.  (I.e. Help – helpless or help – helpful.  Being able to use either ending might not work to make the word meaning clear, and there were very few words to use in the dictionary.   I don't know if the meaning would just be implied in the conversation, but in some situations, I don't think it would work.)  So in short, a lot of these are up to personal interpretation.  So this is what I think, everyone else may look at these words and decide to use other endings and such, and since there is no official documentation, that means we are all correct.  ^_^


Adjectives


Appearance
Aggressive – verd'yc
Attractive – copyc
Beautiful – Mesh'la
blue-eyed – kebiin sur'haai'yc
bloody  - talyc
bright - dral
clean  - cinyc
clear  - utrel'a
colorful –salyc
cute - copikla
dark - dha
Long- haired – Munit  gemas'yc     
misty  - vhipir'la
motionless  - nushaad'la
muddy  - slaat'yc
plain  - hayc
Stealthy - werdla
stormy  - buurenaar'la
Ugly – Jari'eyc                
Ugliest – jari'ene
unusual – haamyc


Condition
Alive – Oyayc                
Bad – Dush                
Better – Jate'shya
Beautiful – mesh'la
brainy  - mirshe'la
breakable  - shukur'yc
careful - ulyc
Clever – Mirda'la
Dead – Kryayc
Delicate – Laandur
difficult  - umaan
easy  - pakod
Evil – Ori'dush
Good – Jate         
important  - jaon'yc
Open – Tenn                   
Pale – Racin                    
real - veman
sleepy – nuhoy'la
Strong – Kotyc               
Stupid – Jare'la
               

Feelings (Bad)
Angry – Kaden                
bad  - dush
black - netra
blue - kebiin
bored  - mirshepar'la
dangerous  - burk'yc
defeated  - rohakyc
evil  - ori'dush
foolish  - utreekovyc
grieving - echoyliryc
lazy - sharal
Sad – Trikar'la
tired  - haryc


Feelings (Good)
Brave – Kotep
Calm – Udesla
charming  - copikla
comfortable – yaim'la
courageous  - mirshkola
determined  - nasreyc
friendly  - burc'yala
funny – nuh'la
glorious - koteyc
Good – Jate         
Happy – Briikase            
healthy - jahaalyc
lively  - oyacyir'la
lucky – jate'karayc
successful  - bralov'la
victorious – parjaila


Shape
flat  - kajil
High – Laamyc               
Long – Munit         
Low – Diryc  
square  - cunak
Thin – Shiib


Size
Big – Ori              
Fat – Ast'ehut           
Short – Skotah            
Small – Kih                 
Tall – Muninar
Tiny – Orikih


Sound
Hushed -  k'uuryc  
silent  - shev'la
soft  - pel
thundering  - oraryc


Time
Early - vaar
Fast – iviin'yc
Late – du'caryc
Long - munit
Old – Ruug'la                 
Short - skotah
New/Young – Evaar'la


Taste/Touch
Delicious - jatisyc
Rotten - kyorla
Salty - paakla
Spicy – Janad / hetikleyc
Strong - kotyc
Tasty - isiriryc
Hard – Muun         
Hot - nadala
rainy - pitatyc
rough - chaavla
Sharp – Kad'la        
slimy - utyc
Soft – Pel               
weak -laanduryc
wet - piryc
wooden – shaap'yc
burning - hettyc
cold  - ciryc
Coarse – Tiin'la        
dirty  - etyc
dry - haast
hot - nadala
wet  - piryc


Quantity
Empty – ut'reeyah
Few – kisol
Many – ori'sol
Too many – naysol
Equal – sosol


[Comparatives tend to be constructed from adjectives with -shy'a and superlatives tend to be constructed from adjectives with -ne. – KT]


A comparative adjective is used when (obviously) using a word to compare different things, equally or otherwise. (Good – Jate, Better – Jate'shya, {Best – Jate'ne = superlative – see statement below})


A superlative adjective is used to describe something to the utmost degree, so the adjective gets the ending –ne, instead of –yc or –la. (I.e. ugly – jari'eyc: ugliest – jari'ene)


(Now, an adverb to me is a word that ends in –ly, but there are not many of those in the dictionary.  So here is a small list that again, comes from a list of common English adverbs, so I'm sure I have missed more of them in the dictionary.)


Adverbs
Again – tug'yc
Certainly – troch
Further- chaashya
Equally – sosolyc
Indeed – bal'ban
Nevertheless-bantov
Next – jii
So – bid
Still - su
Here's a lesson focusing (as best I can) on Adjectives and Adverbs.

Mando'a was created by Karen Traviss (there is a fantastic dictionary and grammar guide on her webpage that I use to make these, go download them if you don't already have them!) for Star Wars, which is property of LucasArts.

I make these lessons because I can't teach myself a language just by reading a dictionary. I try to style them in a way that (theoretically) could be taught in a classroom. At this time, I haven't been focusing on pronunciation or the actual Mando'a alphabet.

These lessons aren't perfect. I had a lot of confusion making this one. Please bear with me. Since Mando'a is incomplete as a language some of the rules are very fluid - a lot is done with personal interpretation, and I'm sure the way I would say/do something might not work for others.
:iconcaroshadow:
CaroShadow Featured By Owner Sep 23, 2010  Hobbyist
long one this time :D
vor'e
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:iconlinzero:
Linzero Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
I figured I owed you all a long one. They are getting harder and harder to make now. Hope this one is useful!
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